Ellen Cemetery

Ann Cook Johnson

October 14, 2019

Ann Cook was born in Fazendeville to Carl Cook and Rose Henderson.

In her late teens/early 20s, Ann moved to New Orleans to work in Storyville. Storyville was an area of legalized prostitution that contained small rooms and elaborate halls. Many of the grand halls were owned by women like Lulu White and “Countess” Willie Piazza. Ann worked for Willie and sang in the district, along with other jazz greats like Louis Armstrong and Buddy Bolden.

Two recordings of Ann Cook remain. This and “Mama Cookie’s Blues”.

By the 1940’s Storyville had closed and Ann had devoted herself to church work and singing gospel for the church choir.

She died in 1962.

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Saint Bernard Catholic Cemetery

Pablo Feliu

October 11, 2019

PABLO SAN FELIU
ASSINATED BY SLAVES
INCITED BY CARPETBAG RULE
DIED OCT 1896

The headstone for Pablo Feliu (unknown – 1868) was erected sometime after Pablo’s death. The inscription is erroneous. Pablo Feliu was killed during the 1868 St Bernard Parish Massacre.

The plantation owners in the parish wanted to reverse the rights of the recently freed slaves. Horatio Seymour was running as the Democratic candidate with the slogan, “This is a white man’s country; let white men rule.” To suppress the freed people from voting Republican (Ulysses S Grant), angry mobs

The plantation owners in the parish wanted to reverse the rights of the recently freed slaves. Horatio Seymour was running as the Democratic candidate with the slogan, “This is a white man’s country; let white men rule.” To suppress the newly freed people from voting Republican (Ulysses S Grant) an armed militia killed between 30-135 people.

Accounts vary about Pablo Feliu’s death. Most stories say that Feliu was a bootlegger and was friends with all in the parish, both black and white. It seems as if he did fire upon a group of men and they killed him. Early accounts say his wife and baby were also killed, but they were proven to have escaped.

There was only one vote for the Republican Party in 1868 in St. Bernard Parish.

The inscription was likely written in the 1960s. Feliu died in 1868 and the man or men who killed him were not slaves. The carpetbag rule was not an imposition from the North but as a result of the contentious election.

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Chalmette National Cemetery

Sarah Rosetta Wakeman

Sarah Rosetta Wakeman (1843- 1864) is buried in Chalmette National Cemetery. She fought in the Civil War for the Union, presenting as a man in order to fight. Her headstone reads “Lyons Wakeman”, as even in death, no one noticed she was a woman. She is part of a number of women who fought in the Civil War and is notable because of her letters back home to New York.

“I don’t know how long before I shall have to go into the field of battle. For my part I don’t care. I don’t feel afraid to go.”

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